Halloween Fun Fact: The FDA�s 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act was misinterpreted by many media outlets, who erroneously reported that the act included a ban on candy cigarettes. In fact, the ban really just affected tobacco cigarettes that had candy (or fruit) flavorings. (Candy cigs were banned in North Dakota from 1953-1967.)


It’s not a secret that Candy corn is one of America’s all-time favorite Halloween candies.  About 20 million pounds of Candy corn will be sold this Halloween!  How completely corny! Candy corn is actually a pretty simple concoction made of sugar, corn syrup and water.  The crafty people at the Goelitz company add a special ingredient with marshmallow in it that gives their candy corn a truly “gourmet” taste.  The best candy corn is super sweet tasting and has an almost vanilla flavor to it.  It should be soft when you bite it (if it’s not…uh, you might not want to eat it.) It’s fun to know the facts about what you are eating and this year when you are gobbling up all that delicious candy corn—you’ll know exactly why you love it! 

In the Roman Catholic Church, Halloween's Christian connection is acknowledged, and Halloween celebrations are common in many Catholic parochial schools.[227][228] Many fundamentalist and evangelical churches use "Hell houses" and comic-style tracts in order to make use of Halloween's popularity as an opportunity for evangelism.[229] Others consider Halloween to be completely incompatible with the Christian faith due to its putative origins in the Festival of the Dead celebration.[230] Indeed, even though Eastern Orthodox Christians observe All Hallows' Day on the First Sunday after Pentecost. The Eastern Orthodox Church recommends the observance of Vespers or a Paraklesis on the Western observance of All Hallows' Eve, out of the pastoral need to provide an alternative to popular celebrations.[231]
^ Moser, Stefan (29 October 2010). "Kein 'Trick or Treat' bei Salzburgs Kelten" (in German). Salzburger Nachrichten. Archived from the original on 17 March 2014. Retrieved 11 August 2017. Die Kelten haben gar nichts mit Halloween zu tun", entkräftet Stefan Moser, Direktor des Keltenmuseums Hallein, einen weit verbreiteten Mythos. Moser sieht die Ursprünge von Halloween insgesamt in einem christlichen Brauch, nicht in einem keltischen.
The modern imagery of Halloween comes from many sources, including Christian eschatology, national customs, works of Gothic and horror literature (such as the novels Frankenstein and Dracula) and classic horror films (such as Frankenstein and The Mummy).[132][133] Imagery of the skull, a reference to Golgotha in the Christian tradition, serves as "a reminder of death and the transitory quality of human life" and is consequently found in memento mori and vanitas compositions;[134] skulls have therefore been commonplace in Halloween, which touches on this theme.[135] Traditionally, the back walls of churches are "decorated with a depiction of the Last Judgment, complete with graves opening and the dead rising, with a heaven filled with angels and a hell filled with devils", a motif that has permeated the observance of this triduum.[136] One of the earliest works on the subject of Halloween is from Scottish poet John Mayne, who, in 1780, made note of pranks at Halloween; "What fearfu' pranks ensue!", as well as the supernatural associated with the night, "Bogies" (ghosts), influencing Robert Burns' "Halloween" (1785).[137] Elements of the autumn season, such as pumpkins, corn husks, and scarecrows, are also prevalent. Homes are often decorated with these types of symbols around Halloween. Halloween imagery includes themes of death, evil, and mythical monsters.[138] Black, orange, and sometimes purple are Halloween's traditional colors.
Plus, in a society that allegedly values racial integration, isn't there something unsettling about the idea that the closest thing to an actual black person at your party could be someone smeared with face paint and wearing an Afro wig? Leonard says this creates a false sense of diversity in at atmospheres that include "everything but the actual person, the community, and the culture." Does that sound like somewhere you'd be proud to be?
The thousands of Halloween postcards produced between the turn of the 20th century and the 1920s commonly show children but not trick-or-treating.[153] Trick-or-treating does not seem to have become a widespread practice until the 1930s, with the first US appearances of the term in 1934,[154] and the first use in a national publication occurring in 1939.[155]
Unfortunately, like most other holidays celebrated, it’s an excuse to have a good time rather than an actual celebration. Despite this, Halloween is one of the most fun holidays to celebrate. The candy, thrills, and costumes are what make it all exciting to us. Costumes, especially costumes for children, are probably the one thing that we stress about as Halloween approaches each year. Browsing the web recently, I’ve found out some very interesting things about costumes. Let me impart to you some of my newfound knowledge.
In old Irish folk law, Jack O’ Lanterns came from the legend, Stingy Jack.  Stingy Jack was a farmer, when died he was turned away from both heaven and hell.  He was forced to roam the streets looking for a final resting place.  Legend says that he carved out a turnip, placed a lit piece of coal inside and used it as a lantern.  He held it to light his way.
There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]
^ Monaghan, Patricia (1 January 2009). The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore. Infobase Publishing. p. 167. ISBN 978-1438110370. Archived from the original on 23 April 2016. Retrieved 19 October 2015. They were both respected and feared. "Their backs towards us, their faces away from us, and may God and Mary save us from harm," was a prayer spoken whenever one ventured near their dwellings.
^ "Vigil of All Saints". Catholic News Agency. 31 October 2012. Archived from the original on 24 May 2013. Retrieved 1 November 2011. The Vigil is based on the monastic office of Vigils (or Matins), when the monks would arise in the middle of the night to pray. On major feast days, they would have an extended service of readings (scriptural, patristic, and from lives of the saints) in addition to chanting the psalms. This all would be done in the dark, of course, and was an opportunity to listen carefully to the Word of God as well as the words of the Church Fathers and great saints. The Vigil of All Saints is an adaptation of this ancient practice, using the canonical office of Compline at the end.

This came from a Scottish fortune-telling game, where girls used cabbage stumps to predict information about their future husbands. In the early Framingham, Massachusetts, teens skipped the fortune-telling and simply went around throwing cabbage at their neighbors’ houses, according to Framingham Legends & Lore. This was no isolated tradition: In late 19th century America, country boys reportedly rejoiced in throwing cabbage, corn and assorted rotten vegetables, according to “Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure.”
In the event that the spoils aren’t scarfed down whole hog, separate chocolate out and keep it in a cool, dark, dry place. Milk chocolate is good for no more than 8 to 10 months, while dark lasts up to two years. Hard candy will also keep in a cool, dry place for about a year. Store soft candies in a covered dish away from direct heat and light. Enjoy them within six months.
It was during the 1930s, about the same time as trick-or-treating, that Halloween-themed haunted houses first began to appear in America. It was in the late 1950s that haunted houses as a major attraction began to appear, focusing first on California. Sponsored by the Children's Health Home Junior Auxiliary, the San Mateo Haunted House opened in 1957. The San Bernardino Assistance League Haunted House opened in 1958. Home haunts began appearing across the country during 1962 and 1963. In 1964, the San Manteo Haunted House opened, as well as the Children's Museum Haunted House in Indianapolis.[182]
All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Real Simple may receive compensation for some links to products and services in this email on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. Real Simple is part of the Meredith Home Group. © Copyright 2019 Meredith Corporationthis link opens in a new tab. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited | Privacy policythis link opens in a new tab | Terms of Servicethis link opens in a new tab | Ad Choicesthis link opens in a new tab | Your California Privacy Rightsthis link opens in a new tab | EU Data Subject Requeststhis link opens in a new tab
This came from a Scottish fortune-telling game, where girls used cabbage stumps to predict information about their future husbands. In the early Framingham, Massachusetts, teens skipped the fortune-telling and simply went around throwing cabbage at their neighbors’ houses, according to Framingham Legends & Lore. This was no isolated tradition: In late 19th century America, country boys reportedly rejoiced in throwing cabbage, corn and assorted rotten vegetables, according to “Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure.”
There have been controversial costumes over the years. One that sparked enormous controversy well before Halloween 2015 is a "Caitlyn Jenner" corset costume. Despite public outcry claiming that the costume is offensive, popular retailers plan to go full steam ahead with selling the costume; one defending their conviction to sell the costume as a celebration of Jenner.[30]
^ Merriam-Webster's Encyclopædia of World Religions. Merriam-Webster. 1999. ISBN 978-0877790440. Retrieved 31 October 2011. Halloween, also called All Hallows' Eve, holy or hallowed evening observed on October 31, the eve of All Saints' Day. The Irish pre-Christian observances influenced the Christian festival of All Hallows' Eve, celebrated on the same date.
Understanding where Halloween costumes came from is a lot easier if you have some knowledge of where Halloween itself originated. The Celts, who lived around 2,000 years ago in Ireland and England, used to mark the end of summertime and the harvest with a festival known as Samhain (translated to mean “summer’s end”). This would take place on October 31st, since November 1st was the beginning of winter and the season of death of many people. Since their new year was the first day of November, the Celtic people thought that the dead and the living merged together the night before. They also believed they could predict the future more accurately since spirits and ghosts were nearby.
^ Portaro, Sam (25 January 1998). A Companion to the Lesser Feasts and Fasts. Cowley Publications. p. 199. ISBN 978-1461660514. All Saints' Day is the centerpiece of an autumn triduum. In the carnival celebrations of All Hallows' Eve our ancestors used the most powerful weapon in the human arsenal, the power of humor and ridicule to confront the power of death. The following day, in the commemoration of All Saints, we gave witness to the victory of incarnate goodness embodied in remarkable deeds and doers triumphing over the misanthropy of darkness and devils. And in the commemoration of All Souls we proclaimed the hope of common mortality expressed in our aspirations and expectations of a shared eternity.
^ As late as 1900, an article on Thanksgiving entertaining recommended a lit jack-o'-lantern as part of the festivities. "The Day We Celebrate: Thanksgiving Treated Gastronomically and Socially" Archived 5 August 2016 at the Wayback Machine, The New York Times, 24 November 1895, p. 27. "Odd Ornaments for Table" Archived 5 August 2016 at the Wayback Machine, The New York Times, 21 October 1900, p. 12.
Shorter days, colder weather, and the need to consume more calories to make it through the impending winter were all factors that coincided with Halloween. Combine this reality with the belief that ghosts returned to earth on Halloween, and you can see our European ancestors had a real conundrum: the need to go out in the dark paired with a fear of ghosts.
In some parts of Ireland, people celebrated Halloween by playing romantic fortune-telling games, according to Nicholas Rogers’ “Halloween: From Pagan Ritual To Party Night.” These games allegedly predicted who they’d marry, and when. Since Halloween, like Valentine’s Day, was one of the main celebrations of the year where young people could mingle with the opposite sex, it was also considered a good day to scope out a sweetheart. In America, young people, particularly girls, continued the old Irish tradition. Games, like bobbing for apples, tried to predict future romances, according to the “Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America.”

It has been estimated that Americans now spend about 350 million dollars on Halloween costumes just for their pets. The dog is by far the biggest participant in the fall extravaganza, with the cat (especially the black cat) coming in a distant second. For all the money spent on the four-legged creatures, the pumpkin is the number one costume choice with the hot dog, pirate, bumblebee, and devil following in that order.

Eddie J. Smith, in his book Halloween, Hallowed is Thy Name, offers a religious perspective to the wearing of costumes on All Hallows' Eve, suggesting that by dressing up as creatures "who at one time caused us to fear and tremble", people are able to poke fun at Satan "whose kingdom has been plundered by our Saviour". Images of skeletons and the dead are traditional decorations used as memento mori.[162][163]
In old Irish folk law, Jack O’ Lanterns came from the legend, Stingy Jack.  Stingy Jack was a farmer, when died he was turned away from both heaven and hell.  He was forced to roam the streets looking for a final resting place.  Legend says that he carved out a turnip, placed a lit piece of coal inside and used it as a lantern.  He held it to light his way.
^ Hörandner, Editha (2005). Halloween in der Steiermark und anderswo. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 99. ISBN 978-3825888893. On the other hand the postmodern phenomenon of "antifashion" is also to be found in some Halloween costumes. Black and orange are a 'must' with many costumes. Halloween – like the medieval danse macabre – is closely connected with superstitions and it might be a way of dealing with death in a playful way.
Move over Jane Fonda, this guy's about to do Richard Simmons proud! Great legs are a plus when you're an attainably fit, non-threatening, workout video star, but a BIG personality is essential. Nearly non-existent striped shorts are perfectly paired with a sparkling tank for a look that says, "LOOK AT ME! LOOK AT ME!" Simply add some sweatbands, shoes with flair, and your smokin' hot dad bod to the mix. Sell the experience by convincing the guests on the dance floor to complete one of your low-impact routines.
On July 2, 2012, seven new character costumes were added to Run 1, exclusively for users playing on Kongregate. The costumes and their unlock times are as follows: Student (start), Caveman (start), Lizard (level 5), Gentleman (level 10), Zombie (level 20), Angel (level 28), and Skater (level 50). Most of the costumes later became unique characters in Run 3. However, at this point, the different characters were simply costumes and had no special abilities. The only exception to this is the Skater; like in Run 3, he moves faster and jumps farther than the other characters. Besides the Skater, none of the costumes affect gameplay.

Have you ever awoken alone in your dorm room only to find that you lost a shoe, but gained a cat? Yeah, no, us neither. For real, we've always had "Buster" (our cat). But let's say that, theoretically, someone unintentionally took another person's kitty ... You know what, how about a cat pun or two? We're not lion when we say that Bonnie & Clyde-types will be feline fine dressed as this morally flexible duo, cat and a burglar. After all, it's meow or never if you want to live long and pros-purr ... seriously though, we didn't steal Buster.
[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37] https://www.halloweenexpress.com/adult-costumes/humorous-costumes/
×