Strong Sad	David Byrne	David Byrne rose to prominence as lead singer of the band Talking Heads. Beginning as part of the punk/new wave movement of the late '70s, the band was quickly distinguished for their experimental lyrical and instrumental style and the nervous energy of Byrne's vocals. He records today as a solo artist. Strong Sad is wearing Byrne's "big suit" from the 1984 Talking Heads concert film Stop Making Sense.	Wikipedia article for David Byrne https://www.halloweencostumes.com/

For those who live to serve and protect, we salute you. When you’re out on the streets, you have to be able to move like a cheetah … a law enforcement cheetah. These short shorts leave you unrestricted, but only Reno 911's bravest and boldest (AKA Officer Dangle) could rock this look. We all understand that police work is very serious business, but you sir, are a master of comedy if you can keep a straight face in this cop's barely-there bottoms all night.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
American historian and author Ruth Edna Kelley of Massachusetts wrote the first book-length history of Halloween in the US; The Book of Hallowe'en (1919), and references souling in the chapter "Hallowe'en in America".[149] In her book, Kelley touches on customs that arrived from across the Atlantic; "Americans have fostered them, and are making this an occasion something like what it must have been in its best days overseas. All Halloween customs in the United States are borrowed directly or adapted from those of other countries".[150]
In some parts of Ireland, people celebrated Halloween by playing romantic fortune-telling games, according to Nicholas Rogers’ “Halloween: From Pagan Ritual To Party Night.” These games allegedly predicted who they’d marry, and when. Since Halloween, like Valentine’s Day, was one of the main celebrations of the year where young people could mingle with the opposite sex, it was also considered a good day to scope out a sweetheart. In America, young people, particularly girls, continued the old Irish tradition. Games, like bobbing for apples, tried to predict future romances, according to the “Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America.”
Since the close of WWII, the celebration of Halloween was increased dramatically. Nowhere is this more evident than in the sales of Halloween candy. Today, it is estimated that Americans will spend just over 2 billion on Halloween candy, second only to Christmas. Chocolate is definitely first on the list, with candy corn coming in a distant second.

^ Hörandner, Editha (2005). Halloween in der Steiermark und anderswo (in German). LIT Verlag Münster. pp. 8, 12, 30. ISBN 978-3825888893. Der Wunsch nach einer Tradition, deren Anfänge sich in grauer Vorzeit verlieren, ist bei Dachleuten wie laien gleichmäßig verbreitet. ... Abgesehen von Irrtümern wie die Herleitung des Fests in ungebrochener Tradition ("seit 2000 Jahren") ist eine mangelnde vertrautheit mit der heimischen Folklore festzustellen. Allerheiligen war lange vor der Halloween invasion ein wichtiger Brauchtermin und ist das ncoh heute. ... So wie viele heimische Bräuche generell als fruchtbarkeitsbringend und dämonenaustreibend interpretiert werden, was trottz aller Aufklärungsarbeit nicht auszurotten ist, begegnet uns Halloween als ...heidnisches Fest. Aber es wird nicht als solches inszeniert.
The modern imagery of Halloween comes from many sources, including Christian eschatology, national customs, works of Gothic and horror literature (such as the novels Frankenstein and Dracula) and classic horror films (such as Frankenstein and The Mummy).[132][133] Imagery of the skull, a reference to Golgotha in the Christian tradition, serves as "a reminder of death and the transitory quality of human life" and is consequently found in memento mori and vanitas compositions;[134] skulls have therefore been commonplace in Halloween, which touches on this theme.[135] Traditionally, the back walls of churches are "decorated with a depiction of the Last Judgment, complete with graves opening and the dead rising, with a heaven filled with angels and a hell filled with devils", a motif that has permeated the observance of this triduum.[136] One of the earliest works on the subject of Halloween is from Scottish poet John Mayne, who, in 1780, made note of pranks at Halloween; "What fearfu' pranks ensue!", as well as the supernatural associated with the night, "Bogies" (ghosts), influencing Robert Burns' "Halloween" (1785).[137] Elements of the autumn season, such as pumpkins, corn husks, and scarecrows, are also prevalent. Homes are often decorated with these types of symbols around Halloween. Halloween imagery includes themes of death, evil, and mythical monsters.[138] Black, orange, and sometimes purple are Halloween's traditional colors.
If you are looking for the best Halloween costume ideas for this year’s festivities, you’ve come to the right place. Whether you are searching for a costume for Halloween night or need the perfect outfit to wear to your upcoming murder mystery party, our costume selection is larger than any other Halloween store in the industry. It’s our mission to provide an unmatched experience when you are shopping for your Halloween costumes, accessories, décor, and costume apparel. We carry high-quality costumes and accessories such as wigs, hats, masks, and costume boots sure to provide costume ideas for everyone and all at a price that will fit even the tightest of budgets. The perfect Halloween costume is only a couple clicks away!
By the end of the 12th century they had become holy days of obligation across Europe and involved such traditions as ringing church bells for the souls in purgatory. In addition, "it was customary for criers dressed in black to parade the streets, ringing a bell of mournful sound and calling on all good Christians to remember the poor souls."[84] "Souling", the custom of baking and sharing soul cakes for all christened souls,[85] has been suggested as the origin of trick-or-treating.[86] The custom dates back at least as far as the 15th century[87] and was found in parts of England, Flanders, Germany and Austria.[56] Groups of poor people, often children, would go door-to-door during Allhallowtide, collecting soul cakes, in exchange for praying for the dead, especially the souls of the givers' friends and relatives.[87][88][89] Soul cakes would also be offered for the souls themselves to eat,[56] or the 'soulers' would act as their representatives.[90] As with the Lenten tradition of hot cross buns, Allhallowtide soul cakes were often marked with a cross, indicating that they were baked as alms.[91] Shakespeare mentions souling in his comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[92] On the custom of wearing costumes, Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognized by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[93]

Stinkoman Speed Racer Speed Racer is the title character in the classic anime Speed Racer, or Mach Go Go Go in Japan. Speed Racer, or Go Mifune, is a young stock car racer who strives to win in the cutthroat world of racing. It was one of the first anime to be imported into North America and dubbed, giving many people their first taste of Japanese animation. Giving Stinkoman the "Akira" jar will make his arm explode into a grotesque organic tendril, which is a reference to the 1988 film Akira, which is also considered an entry-level anime for new fans. Wikipedia article for Speed Racer
^ Kernan, Joe (30 October 2013). "Not so spooky after all: The roots of Halloween are tamer than you think". Cranston Herald. Archived from the original on 26 November 2015. Retrieved 31 October 2015. By the early 20th century, Halloween, like Christmas, was commercialized. Pre-made costumes, decorations and special candy all became available. The Christian origins of the holiday were downplayed.
The Child's Halloween costume is a homemade ghost costume. When the Child's costume is equipped, he wears a white sheet that covers nearly all of his body except his feet, with one hole in it for his eye. His balloon is white as well. He is officially known as the Ghost when wearing his costume. This is the only costume to not affect the character's stats at all.
Chris Farley and Adam Sandler knew the hysterical quotient of a big, burly lunch lady, and their over-the-top SNL sketch became an instant classic. Put your own spin on everyone's favorite foodie with props like messy lipstick, a stock pot and ladle, ugly shoes, a unibrow, missing teeth, a ginormous mole or a pair of ill-fitting stockings with a lot of runs in them. Of course, this is an epic transformation that's best served with hoagies, grinders and a side of slop-sloppy joes! 

Understanding where Halloween costumes came from is a lot easier if you have some knowledge of where Halloween itself originated. The Celts, who lived around 2,000 years ago in Ireland and England, used to mark the end of summertime and the harvest with a festival known as Samhain (translated to mean “summer’s end”). This would take place on October 31st, since November 1st was the beginning of winter and the season of death of many people. Since their new year was the first day of November, the Celtic people thought that the dead and the living merged together the night before. They also believed they could predict the future more accurately since spirits and ghosts were nearby.
It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions originated from ancient Celtic harvest festivals, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain; that such festivals may have had pagan roots; and that Samhain itself was Christianized as Halloween by the early Church.[12][13][14][15][16] Some believe, however, that Halloween began solely as a Christian holiday, separate from ancient festivals like Samhain.[17][18][19][20]
In France, some Christian families, on the night of All Hallows' Eve, prayed beside the graves of their loved ones, setting down dishes full of milk for them.[102] On Halloween, in Italy, some families left a large meal out for ghosts of their passed relatives, before they departed for church services.[115] In Spain, on this night, special pastries are baked, known as "bones of the holy" (Spanish: Huesos de Santo) and put them on the graves of the churchyard, a practice that continues to this day.[116]

Some characters tend to have costumes that follow a trend. For example, Coach Z often dresses up as a rap or hip-hop icon, The Cheat usually dresses up as a cartoon character, The Poopsmith typically dresses up as a science fiction character, The King of Town normally dresses up as a food mascot, and Marzipan occasionally dresses up as a (often male) musician. Other characters tend to dress up as something that suits their body type, though not necessarily their personality.
A popular variant of trick-or-treating, known as trunk-or-treating (or Halloween tailgaiting), occurs when "children are offered treats from the trunks of cars parked in a church parking lot", or sometimes, a school parking lot.[116][156] In a trunk-or-treat event, the trunk (boot) of each automobile is decorated with a certain theme,[157] such as those of children's literature, movies, scripture, and job roles.[158] Trunk-or-treating has grown in popularity due to its perception as being more safe than going door to door, a point that resonates well with parents, as well as the fact that it "solves the rural conundrum in which homes [are] built a half-mile apart".[159][160]
Create your comedy routine with one of our funny adult costumes. Whether you need funny costumes for women or men, with this large selection of funny costumes you are sure to find something unique for you next Halloween get together. Pair up with a friend to create a comedic duo or go solo to be the life of the party and light up the room on your own. With one of our funny Halloween costumes you will be sure to amuse. Our funny adult Halloween costumes are perfect for bringing laughter to any party!
Our funny Halloween costumes come in many varieties, because there are so many types of humor out there. We have full body funny costumes that transform the wearer into some kind of mundane object brought to life, like a banana, fire hydrant, or even a beer bottle. This cartoonish form is always sure to get a laugh. We also carry "adults only" style costumes that often bring a nude body part to life in a massive way, or perhaps are a visual pun on an adult expression or sexual activity. These kid's funny costumes bring a cute animal, storybook character, or other humorous creature to life in a new way. With our funny costumes, everyone, even the kids, get in on the laughter!
Chris Farley and Adam Sandler knew the hysterical quotient of a big, burly lunch lady, and their over-the-top SNL sketch became an instant classic. Put your own spin on everyone's favorite foodie with props like messy lipstick, a stock pot and ladle, ugly shoes, a unibrow, missing teeth, a ginormous mole or a pair of ill-fitting stockings with a lot of runs in them. Of course, this is an epic transformation that's best served with hoagies, grinders and a side of slop-sloppy joes!
But the public service announcements haven’t worked. Each Halloween serves as a reminder that a giant gulf remains between people who understand that blackface is in bad taste, or are willing to defer to black people who tell them so, and people who are still asking “But why? (You know, the ones who are thinking as they read this, “You say it’s racist but I can tell you right now I’m not racist, so it’s fine if I wear it! Come on, get over it! Stop with the political correctness! I don’t understand how this is offensive! It’s a joke!”)

In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighborly get-togethers than about ghosts, pranks and witchcraft. At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties focused on games, foods of the season and festive costumes.


A popular variant of trick-or-treating, known as trunk-or-treating (or Halloween tailgaiting), occurs when "children are offered treats from the trunks of cars parked in a church parking lot", or sometimes, a school parking lot.[116][156] In a trunk-or-treat event, the trunk (boot) of each automobile is decorated with a certain theme,[157] such as those of children's literature, movies, scripture, and job roles.[158] Trunk-or-treating has grown in popularity due to its perception as being more safe than going door to door, a point that resonates well with parents, as well as the fact that it "solves the rural conundrum in which homes [are] built a half-mile apart".[159][160]
All Souls Day was celebrated similarly to Samhain, with big bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels and devils. The All Saints Day celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas (from Middle English Alholowmesse meaning All Saints’ Day) and the night before it, the traditional night of Samhain in the Celtic religion, began to be called All-Hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween.
Costumes are popularly employed at sporting events, during which fans dress as their team's representative mascot to show their support. Businesses use mascot costumes to bring in people to their business either by placing their mascot in the street by their business or sending their mascot out to sporting events, festivals, national celebrations, fairs, and parades. Mascots appear at organizations wanting to raise awareness of their work. Children's Book authors create mascots from the main character to present at their book signings. Animal costumes that are visually very similar to mascot costumes are also popular among the members of the furry fandom, where the costumes are referred to as fursuits and match one's animal persona, or "fursona".
The jack-o’-lantern comes from an old Irish tale about a man named Stingy Jack. According to folklore, Stingy Jack was out getting sloshed with the Devil when Jack convinced his drinking partner to turn himself into a coin to pay for the drinks without spending money. Jack then put the Devil, shaped like a coin, into his pocket, which also contained a silver cross that kept the Devil from transforming back. Jack promised to free the Devil as long as the Devil wouldn’t bother him for a year, and if he died, the Devil could never claim his soul. Jack tricked the Devil again later, getting him to pick a piece of fruit out of a tree and then carving a cross into the bark when the Devil was in the branches. This trick bought Jack another 10 years of devil-free living.
The wolves of Wall Street have nothing on you! Listen, we're not promising that Matthew McConaughey would chant this baller money suit's praises, but there's a good chance. Wear it to your interview at Goldman Sachs, or even at the local car dealership, and let the power of cold, hard cash compel you! Think it's lacking conservative appeal? Ask yourself this: Who doesn't want to hire the guy with his mind on his money and money on his mind?
Most experts trace trick-or-treating to the European practice of “mumming,” or “guysing,” in which costume-wearing participants would go door-to-door performing choreographed dances, songs and plays in exchange for treats. According to Elizabeth Pleck’s “Celebrating The Family,” the tradition cropped up in America, where it would often take place on Thanksgiving.
The wearing of costumes is an important part of holidays developed from religious festivals such as Mardi Gras (in the lead up to Easter), and Halloween (related to All Hallow's Eve). Mardi Gras costumes usually take the form of jesters and other fantasy characters; Halloween costumes traditionally take the form of supernatural creatures such as ghosts, vampires, pop-culture icons and angels. In modern times. Christmas costumes typically portray characters such as Santa Claus (developed from Saint Nicholas). In Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States the American version of a Santa suit and beard is popular; in the Netherlands, the costume of Zwarte Piet is customary. Easter costumes are associated with the Easter Bunny or other animal costumes.
Spiders would usually appear in the haunted houses and graveyards. Will you stand it if a spider were to crawl on you? Most probably NO! Unless you are trained to handle these creatures. Naturally, human beings fear spider and the reason behind this is not clear. However, it is a fact that some species of living spiders can kill you. Examples of such spiders include Brown recluse and the black widow. It is their creepy and haunting nature that links them to Halloween.
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